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  • “Clayton Szczech – A widely respected ‘Tequila Geek’ and owner of Experience Tequila recommends Casachuín Blanco, Real Mexicana “Extra Dry” Extra-añejo, and 7 Leguas Single Barrel Extra-añejo.” (more…)

    5 Of the World’s Best Tequilas You’ve (Probably) Never Heard Of — And Where You Can Find Them (Forbes September 2016)

  • “Designed by owner Clayton Szczech as ‘group tours for people who don’t do group tours,’ Experience Tequila offers hands-on tours around Mexico’s eponymous region to acquaint guests with the spirit. Clients will learn about all the parts of the tequila production process, from agave cultivation and harvesting to distilling. Guests will also imbibe in the private tasting rooms of some of the oldest tequileros (tequila experts) in the world.”

    (more…)

    7 Unique Group Tours in Mexico (Travel Age West, September 2016)

  • “We opt for a tour with Clayton Szczech, a self-styled tequila connoisseur. He guides us around the area, where we watch a jimador harvest the agave plant from which tequila is made.” (more…)

    Heart of Jalisco – Authentic Experiences in Guadalajara (Alaska Beyond September 2016)

  • “Some of the best, most informative tours…were led by Clayton Szczech—a widely respected “tequila geek” and owner of Experience Tequila.”

    (more…)

    Why Some Of The World’s Best Tequilas Are Under The Radar — And How You Can Find Them (Forbes, August 2016)

  • Blue Agave Endangered by Highlands Snow

    by Clayton J. Szczech, March 11, 2016

    Residents of Jalisco’s Highlands region awoke Thursday to a substantial blanket of snow and ice covering the ground and local crops, including the emblematic Highland blue agaves. Online social media quickly filled with stunning and beautiful images, and alteños young and old took advantage of the novel opportunity to make snowmen and snow angels – activities they usually only see in foreign movies.

    Those younger than about 25 years had never seen snow locally before. Their parents, however, easily recalled the winter of 1997, when a similar winter blizzard brought snow to the region for the first time in a century. That literal storm was an early element in the metaphorical perfect storm that created the severe shortage and crisis in the blue agave industry in the early 2000s. As the snow and ice continue to melt today, agaveros, tequileros and observers throughout the region are holding their breath, waiting to see how bad the damage will be.

    Frozen Agave in Los Altos de Jalisco

    Photo courtesy Federación Jalisco Internacional.

    The blue agave has evolved for tens of thousands of years to survive extremes of heat and aridity. It is not native to the Jalisco Highlands, where it began to be planted only around the turn on the 20th century. The plants do not easily bear extended cold snaps, much less freezes like this. Extended low temperatures will “burn” the agaves’ tissues. Sugar content, necessary for Tequila production, can plummet. Agaves two years old and younger are particularly vulnerable, particularly if the cogollo (the top center portion of the plant, where new leaves emerge) is frozen.

     

    Today I spoke with Dr. Adolfo Murillo, a Highlands native, organic agave farmer and owner of Tequila Alquimia, about what they’re seeing on their agave ranch in Agua Negra, on the outskirts of Arandas.

    “Luckily for us, our fields are on the fringes of the state of Jalisco [near the Guanajuato border], where we get less rainfall in any given year. It turns out we also got less snow, “ said Murillo. “I’ve always said that the layout of the fields is very important. Agaves should be planted on a slope for good drainage, as ours are. Also, the slope should be toward the morning sun, so the agaves are warmed since early in the morning on cold mornings. Again by luck, in Agua Negra the sun began to shine early in the morning, so the snow that had fallen on our agave was melted off fairly quickly, and the agaves do not appear to have sustained any damage.”

    Dr. Murillo explains that it doesn’t take long to assess the damage. Plants that have been sufficiently frozen will begin to wilt as they thaw, eventually drying out and rotting.

    Industry veteran and Selección ArteNOM owner Jake Lustig remembers 1997 and the ensuing crisis period well. That freeze, and the ensuing vulnerability of the agaves to a variety of pests led to “widespread consolidation and surrendering of Mexico’s national spirit to multi-national conglomerates earning their capital in Tennessee whiskey, Puerto Rican rum or French vodka, who could sustain agave price fluctuations. Some folks without that ‘diversification’ went bankrupt and closed or sold out,” according to Lustig.

    Jake Lustig and Enrique Fonseca

    Jake Lustig and master distiller Enrique Fonseca. Photo courtesy Jake Lustig.

    As the whole world begins to grapple with the reality of accelerated climate change, the Tequila industry will not be an exception. Dr. Murillo points out that this snowstorm is no fluke, but rather the latest incident in years of changing regional weather patterns including freezing temperatures as early as October, sporadic and unpredictable rain, and a general breakdown in the formerly predictable annual weather pattern of warm temperatures and near daily rain from July to September.

    We should know a lot more about the severity of the damage to the agave crop in the coming weeks and months. In the meantime, you can be sure that thousands throughout Jalisco will be praying that the damage is light. Jake Lustig will be among them, signing off a recent message with this: “Let’s light a candle and hope that global warming trends pardon Mexico on this cycle and we don’t experience such dramatic losses.”

    For continued updates on this situation, and all aspects of Tequila, sign up for our newsletter in the upper right hand margin of this page. Cover photo courtesy of Jenny Camarena.

    Blue Agave Endangered by Highlands Snow

  • “In the dim lighting, as the spirit warmed us, it felt almost as if Szczech were holding service in tequila church.”

    A two-part L.A. Times Travel section cover story, on touring Tequila and Guadalajara and tasting Tequila.

    Here is a PDF of the original travel section as it ran in print.

    More Experience Tequila media coverage.

     

     

     

     

    On the Tequila trail (LA Times, October 2015)

  • “Frankenstein is a new take on an old technology. Made from salvaged parts, it’s a steam roller with metal knobs welded around a cylindrical body, which spins on an old railroad car axle. The whole contraption is set above a narrow stone channel, where it rolls over roasted agave hearts, crushing them to extract their juices—the key ingredient in 100 percent agave tequila.”

    Click here to read the original article in its entirety.

    More Experience Tequila media coverage.

    Tales of the Cocktail Highlands Tours (October 2015)

  • Review: ¡Tequila! Distilling the Spirit of Mexico. Marie Sarita Gaytán. Stanford University Press (2014).

    As Tequila nerds, we love trivia. “How long does it take agave to mature? How long is añejo aged? Who first exported Tequila?” All too often, knowledge of these basic, rote facts is touted as expertise. The deeper questions of Tequila’s meaning(s), winners, losers and future trajectory are all too often sidestepped or not even considered. Marie Sarita Gaytán’s ¡Tequila! Distilling the Spirit of Mexico is a fantastic book that addresses these issues in a way that’s likely new for the non-academic Tequila fan.

    ¡Tequila! presents and analyzes Mexico’s most famous beverage as “a complex cultural commodity…first and foremost…about the people of Mexico.” The book is a critical cultural analysis of how and why Tequila came to be constructed as a potent symbol of Mexican national identity and its changing meanings throughout history and into contemporary times. Gaytán is a sociologist and although I am sure this book will be used in undergraduate university courses, the book is lucid, accessibly written and of interest to all Tequila aficionados.

    While not attempting to be a thoroughgoing history, the book deftly connects the dots between important historical events and eras from the Spanish Conquest to the present. The first chapter, on the history of Tequila, mezcal, and pulque, is possibly the best summary in English that I’ve seen. Even if the rest of the book’s cultural theory loses more casual readers, this chapter should be required reading for anyone interested in Mexican beverages. The relationship of pulque – an indigenous, pre-Hispanic brew of fermented agave sap- to Tequila is widely misunderstood and misrepresented in the Tequila industry. Gaytán demonstrates how pulque was seen by the ruling Spanish (and later creoles) as “too native.” Its association with the rowdy, race-mixing masses of Mexico City made it inappropriate as a national icon. Since there was no way to stabilize and bottle it at the time, its geographical range of consumption was also limited.

    This artful weaving of cultural and material factors is characteristic of Gaytán’s analysis. She draws upon both types of evidence to explain the “why” of Tequila. Why is it that, amongst Mexico’s scores of distilled spirits, the one from Tequila, Jalisco became a national emblem? In the post-Tequila Boom 21st century, it can be easy to forget that this was far from a foregone conclusion. The Tequila-soaked world in which we live is a very new reality. The first “Norm” governing Tequila production wasn’t published until 1949, Tequila became Mexico’s first Denomination of Origin product in 1974, the Tequila Regulatory Council was created only in 1994

    Gaytan BookIn explaining how Tequila came to be the globally recognized Mexican spirit, Gaytán analyses how Guadalajara and the Jalisco Highlands were deliberately juxtaposed to Mexico City as a “racially pure,” idyllic-yet-modern archetype for a new Mexican century and identity. The extermination of natives in Jalisco had been particularly effective, meaning there was a surplus of available land. Investment flowed into the region when precious metals were discovered, and the cultivation of agave was a cheap investment with a guaranteed payoff. Very often “why Tequila?” is treated as a mystery to which there is no real answer. It is gratifying to see material factors like the ascension of the Port of San Blas and the introduction of the railroad finally acknowledged in a serious way.

    It isn’t news to anyone that Tequila is considered a symbol of Mexican national identity, an internationally recognized marker of “Mexicanness.” Gaytán’s analysis goes beyond the surface though, to explore the ways in which this symbol was constructed historically and how its meaning continues to be contested in ways that reflect upon social class, race and gender. If Tequila comes to represent a certain way of “being Mexican” or “doing Mexico,” that is necessarily at the exclusion of other potential ways of being and doing. In Gaytán’s analysis, “Mexicanness” itself is a contested category that would at times exclude the indigenous, urban poor and women.

    A feminist gender analysis is present throughout the book – a long-overdue development given that popularly accessible books about Tequila have been overwhelmingly written by men. Gaytán addresses Tequila’s role in the construction of masculinity and femininity, using depictions of Pancho Villa, and the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema as rich sources of data. The chapter on Tequila in the comedia ranchera film genre is particularly rich, and is an excellent introduction to that crucial piece of Mexican culture.

    This book will tear some people’s blinders off when it comes to the contemporary reality of Tequila. If you are content buying into marketing myths and not questioning the ethics behind the industry, this book will make you a bit uncomfortable. Gaytán’s analysis of Tequila’s tourism industry is particularly damning. She argues strongly that projects like La Ruta del Tequila, and the village’s “Pueblo Mágico” designation have all served to further concentrate resources in the hands of the industry’s largest players, to the detriment of small producers, farmers and local families. Likewise, her critique of the use of jimadores and the agave goddess Mayahuel to sell Tequila and elicit loyalty to the Tequila category provides necessary “next-level” understanding of the myths and realities of Tequila culture.

    My only substantive criticism of this book is that a couple of the chapters (on Pancho Villa, and discussions on Tequila with current-day Mexican and Mexican-American drinkers) don’t feel as integrated as the rest. In particular, the interviews with consumers on the meaning of Tequila drinking was the only place in the book where the theoretical aspects felt rather forced, and where it seemed like grand conclusions were drawn from limited data.

    The book is so strong though, that it did leave me wanting more. I’d love to see the gender analysis of Tequila’s cultural history brought to bear upon contemporary branding and consumption practices, as well as further qualitative research into the meaning of Tequila consumption amongst the international and multi-ethnic aficionado scene. Hopefully this book will inspire further writing in the same vein.

    I highly recommend this insightful book to anyone with any interest or involvement in the Tequila industry. Regardless of your level of knowledge or experience, you’ll certainly learn something, have your assumptions challenged in a constructive way, and deepen your understanding of the culture of Tequila.

    -Clayton J. Szczech

    Check out previous Tequila book reviews from Experience Tequila, including a selected bibliography of older Tequila books. 

    Review: “Tequila! Distilling the Spirit of Mexico,” by Marie Sarita Gaytan

  • Fermentation: A Depraved Gift from Nature

    When you think about it, drinking booze is kind of weird and gross.

    First of all, an arguably rational species (us) will seek out – often at great expense and risk of self-harm – a substance that is toxic to them. That’s the weird part.

    The gross part is that the toxic substance – ethyl alcohol– is excreted as waste by little critters that we can’t even see. Those critters – yeast, a type of fungus – are pretty bizarre themselves, from an anthropocentric point of view. These guys can live in a state of suspended animation for months or years, but somehow wake up when they get a whiff of sugar.

    Neither little kids at a fructose-fueled birthday party nor frat boys have anything on yeast. The yeast usually begin with an orgy of instant reproduction, then proceed to gorge themselves on sugar, spray alcohol all over the place, and die once they’ve consumed all the snacks.  These gatherings are huge – as many as 100 billion single-celled yeast organisms may inhabit one liter of actively fermenting liquid.

    You may remember the process of fermentation from high school biology described as yeast converting sugar into ethyl alcohol (also called ethanol), carbon dioxide, and heat. In reality, that’s an oversimplification, since not all yeast is created equal, and different species and subpopulations of yeast will produce very different types and amounts of other (non-ethanol) compounds called “congeners.”

    Congeners are what makes booze interesting. Ethyl alcohol is ethyl alcohol: in moderate quantities it makes most people feel good, but that’s about as far as it goes. Congeners are responsible for the aromas and flavors that dazzle the palate and/or provide a socially acceptable pretext for a good buzz.

    In the fermentation of cooked agave, congeners include compounds like fatty acids, esters, sulfur compounds, aldehydes, and other alcohols. When concentrated (via distillation), compounds like these can create pleasant aromas and flavors resembling spices, fruits, flowers, herbs and nuts.

    So the next time you sip your favorite Tequila, mezcal, or any other adult beverage, take a moment to give thanks to our disgusting little comrades who give their lives so that we might imbibe. ¡Salud!

     To occasionally receive  fun, educational emails about topics like this, please sign up for our newsletter, in the upper right-hand corner of this page. Thank you! 

    Fermentation: A Depraved Gift from Nature

  • It’s all about immersing our guests in a real, authentic, Mexican village that is the heart of the rich culture of tequila making,” says Szczech.

    Click here to read the original article in its entirety.

    More Experience Tequila media coverage.

     

    Mexico’s Tequila Trail (Chilled Magazine, July 2015)

  • “Clayton is absolutely obsessed and spends almost all his time in the field talking to mezcaleros, growers, and tons of other people connected to the industry. As he told me: “I made the decision that this was going to be my profession,  and it really is. This is all I do.”

    Click here to read the original article in its entirety.

    More Experience Tequila media coverage.

     

     

    In the field with mezcal and tequila guide Clayton Szczech (Mezcalistas, March 2015)

  • Experience Tequila launched in December, 2008. To commemorate our fifth anniversary, we asked friends and colleagues for their comments or reflections on our first five years. We will post the comments over the course of several months.
    Leopoldo Solís is a legendary master distillery and Tequila consultant. He was at Cazadores in its prime, and has worked on flavor profiles for several brands made at the Vivanco distillery (NOM 1414), and Tequila Don Pilar. His explanations of the chemistry of fermentation and distillation are some of the most lucid I have heard.

    “Experience Tequila’s contribution has been the diffusion of the culture of Tequila. They have contributed to a better understanding and, therefore, appreciation of this world class alcoholic beverage.

    Congratulations for having this idea, and we wish you many more years of growth and success. Onward!”

    -Ing. Leopoldo Solis Tinoco,  Profesionales en Equipo y Filtración, S.A. de C.V.

    This testimonial is part of a series marking Experience Tequila’s fifth anniversary. If you would like to submit your own, we would love to hear from you! Simply email us

    Leopoldo Solis on Fifth Anniversary of ET

  • Experience Tequila launched in December, 2008. To commemorate our fifth anniversary, we asked friends and colleagues for their comments or reflections on our first five years. We will post the comments over the course of several months.Experience Tequila launched in December, 2008. To commemorate our fifth anniversary, we asked friends and colleagues for their comments or reflections on our first five years. We will post the comments over the course of several months.
    Jacob Lustig has been blazing his own trail in the spirits business for many years. When I first became aware of his Selección ArteNOM line of tequila, I thought “That’s a great idea!” When I saw that he had chosen three of my favorite distilleries to feature – NOMs 1146, 1414 and 1079 (now 1580)- I thought “I have to meet this guy!” What ensued was an hour long phone call while we were both traveling and the discovery of an agave brother from another mother. I can’t emphasize enough how much I respect Jake and what he does for tequila. Salud, amigo!

    “Experience Tequila has drawn more people to the enjoyment of Mexico’s premier agave distillate by increasing product knowledge and popularity. Clayton’s pursuit of accurate, pertinent production details and dissemination to a growing body of enthusiasts fulfills a critical need in the continuously developing culture of tequila.

    Congratulations Clayton, the first five years are the hardest!”

    -Jacob Lustig, Las Joyas del Agave

     Jacob Lustig

    This testimonial is part of a series marking Experience Tequila’s fifth anniversary. If you would like to submit your own, we would love to hear from you! Simply email us

    Jacob Lustig (ArteNOM) on 5th Anniversary of ET

  • Experience Tequila launched in December, 2008. To commemorate our fifth anniversary, we asked friends and colleagues for their comments or reflections on our first five years. We will post the comments over the course of several months.
    Ana María Romero Mena is the most widely recognized maestra tequilera in the field of tasting and sensorial evaluation. I’ve had the pleasure of studying with her in various courses since March, 2011. Her instruction has been invaluable in honing my modest skills as a taster, and she continues to have a huge impact on the industry as an educator and consultant on flavor and aroma profiles. Maestra, thank you for everything!

    “Many congratulations, Clayton. I feel proud to have had students like you, committed to tequila not only with professionalism, but with heart. May you have many more successes for many more years. A big hug!

    -Ana Maria Romero Mena, Sensorial Creativa

    This testimonial is part of a series marking Experience Tequila’s fifth anniversary. If you would like to submit your own, we would love to hear from you! Simply email us
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    Ana Maria Romero Mena on 5th Anniversary of ET

  • Experience Tequila launched in December, 2008. To commemorate our fifth anniversary, we asked friends and colleagues for their comments or reflections on our first five years. We will post the comments over the course of several months.
    Diana Jiménez is one of the most recognizable faces in the industry, traveling tirelessly as a global ambassador for Casa Centinela. Centinela has been a regular stop on our Highlands tours from the very beginning. Thank you, Diana and Centinela!

    “Experience Tequila is a great opportunity to get closer to the Tequila Culture. Since this great project started, it has grown into the hearts of the people and also helped to increase Tequila knowledge.

    Clayton, you certainly deserve all the success and recognition from us in the industry, for your hard work and dedication. Salud to that!”

    -Diana Jimenez, Casa Centinela

    This testimonial is part of a series marking Experience Tequila’s fifth anniversary. If you would like to submit your own, we would love to hear from you! Simply email us

    Diana Jimenez (Tequila Centinela) on 5th Anniversary of ET

  • Experience Tequila launched in December, 2008. To commemorate our fifth anniversary, we asked friends and colleagues for their comments or reflections on our first five years. We will post the comments over the course of several months.
    Dr. Jaime Villalobos is a true maestro tequilero. he producers several brands including Realeza Mexicana, Corazón Maya and Mexitas. As a producer, his knowledge of production and chemistry is mind-blowing. As an author and historian of tequila and its tradition, he is equally impressive, having created the “Distintivo T” curriculum for the CRT and written the definitive history of the Sauza family. He was also a founding member of the Academia Mexicana de Catadores de Tequila. I had the privilege of studying with Dr. Villalobos for the better part of a year, ultimately earning a certification of “Experto en Tequila.” Thank you, maestro, for everything!

    “I greatly value Clayton’s attitude and courage in immersing himself completely in the culture of tequila. I feel proud to be his teacher and a teacher is always happy when his students excel.

    Clayton, may you continue learning about our beverage, our history and promote it with pride!”

    -Dr. Jaime Augusto Villalobos Díaz, Cultura y Capacitación del Tequila, A.C.

    This testimonial is part of a series marking Experience Tequila’s fifth anniversary. If you would like to submit your own, we would love to hear from you! Simply email us

     

    Dr. Jaime Villalobos on 5th Anniversary of ET

  • Experience Tequila launched in December, 2008. To commemorate our fifth anniversary, we asked friends and colleagues for their comments or reflections on our first five years. We will post the comments over the course of several months.
    We’ve been fans of Azunia Tequila since trying it at the Spirits of Mexico Festival around 2009. Owner Jim Riley is part owner of this delicious and under-rated tequila, as well as an off-road truck racer. Jim is a tequila  fan first and foremost, and was responsible for bringing Amatitán’s classic Tequila Regional into the US. Thank you, Jim, for your kind words!

    “I have known Clayton and his Company “Experience Tequila” for several years now. Although I have always viewed him as one of the industry experts and one of the few people that are truly passionate for tequila. It was not until a recent trip to the Pacific Northwest did I realize how widespread his effect actually was. In an area where tequila is emerging through the efforts of few boutique brands, Clayton is well known as the main authority on tequilas. His tours are have an excellent reputation as being educational and fun. It is our goal to utilize Experience Tequila more in the future as we continue to grow our own line of tequila.

    Congratulations on 5 years of spreading the word about Tequila and the beauty of all that Mexico has to offer. As a producer of a boutique tequila, we sincerely appreciate your efforts to bring guests to a wonderful country filled with the finest people. Salud!”

    -Jim Riley, Founder,  Azunia Tequila

    Jim Riley made Clayton's day in 2013 by introducing him to basketball legend, Portland favorite, and Azunia co-owner Bill Walton.

    Jim Riley made Clayton’s day in 2013 by introducing him to basketball legend, Portland favorite, and Azunia co-owner Bill Walton.

     

    This testimonial is part of a series marking Experience Tequila’s fifth anniversary. If you would like to submit your own, we would love to hear from you! Simply email us

    Jim Riley (Azunia Tequila) on 5th Anniversary of ET

  • Experience Tequila launched in December, 2008. To commemorate our fifth anniversary, we asked friends and colleagues for their comments or reflections on our first five years. We will post the comments over the course of several months.
    Casa del Matador, in both Portland and Seattle, has hosted many of our scores of tasting events over the past five years. We’ve working more closely with Kristina Schulte at Portland’s East Burnside location than with anyone else, and she is a true tequila lover and consummate professional. Thank you Kristin and Casa del Matador for accompanying us on the first five years of our tequila journey!

    “Casa del Matador Restaurant and Tequila Bar has had a professional relationship with Clayton and Experience Tequila for years. When I first moved to Portland to take over managing this restaurant I was told by many people that Clayton was the go-to-guy for tequila in Portland. We are extremely lucky to have Clayton as a contact in the tequila industry and I now consider him to be the go-to-guy for tequila in general. His passion and dedication to what he does is apparent the moment he begins speaking about the history, production and traditions of tequila. He has conducted educational meetings and tastings here which have reignited our desire to learn and really get involved in the intricacies of each tequila we carry. I’ve worked in the tequila industry for nearly 9 years and always learn something new when I talk to Clayton. I will continue to utilize Experience Tequila as a resource and recommend his services to anyone who has the desire to learn more about such a noble and complex spirit such as tequila.

    Congratulations to Clayton and Experience Tequila for 5 years of educating, sharing and enriching the tequila industry with your wealth of knowledge. May you continue to celebrate your success in the years to come. Thank you for your invaluable contributions to our staff and the spirits industry.”

    -Kristina Schulte, Casa del Matador East Burnside

    This testimonial is part of a series marking Experience Tequila’s fifth anniversary. If you would like to submit your own, we would love to hear from you! Simply email us

    Kristina Schulte (Casa del Matador) on Fifth Anniversary of ET

  • Experience Tequila launched in December, 2008. To commemorate our fifth anniversary, we asked friends and colleagues for their comments or reflections on our first five years. We will post the comments over the course of several months.
    Casa Noble is s huge favorite among tequila fans, and truly committed to tequila education. Their organic and sustainable agave program and meticulous blending from new French oak barrels make them truly unique in the industry. Founder Jose “Pepe” Hermosillo and Vice President David Yan were some of our earliest supporters. Thank you, Casa Noble!

    “It is fantastic to see a company/person with such passion for tequila. Experience Tequila has taken the time to learn and do things correctly, extending the knowledge of tequila.

    Our great respect for Clayton, congratulations on a fantastic job in teaching about tequila and its culture.”

    -Jose Hermosillo, Casa Noble

    Clayton and Dave Yan

    With David Yan at one of our countless visits to Casa Noble.

    “Experience Tequila provides an unparalleled learning opportunity that connects people with the culture, people and brands that make Tequila such a unique and fascinating industry. Immersing visitors into a total experience that includes the history, production and people that help make Tequila such a unique product, helps provide an unforgettable journey that would otherwise be impossible for an individual to acquire.

    Our deepest gratitude to Experience Tequila supporting Casa Noble in such a professional, authentic way. The privilege of hosting hundreds of his guests throughout this 5 years has given us the chance to generate and develop many invaluable relationships, thanks to the possibility of sharing the full Casa Noble Experience, where we immerse every person into a journey of the senses: the chance to see, hear, taste, smell and feel every single aspect of how we make our handcrafted luxury tequilas. Your collaboration also extends beyond borders, helping spread the Casa Noble experience in dozens of tastings, pairing dinners and seminars across the USA. Thank you SO much for your invaluable and continuous help.”

    -David Yan, Casa Noble

     

    This testimonial is part of a series marking Experience Tequila’s fifth anniversary. If you would like to submit your own, we would love to hear from you! Simply email us

    Casa Noble on 5th Anniversary of ET

  • Experience Tequila launched in December, 2008. To commemorate our fifth anniversary, we asked friends and colleagues for their comments or reflections on our first five years. We will post the comments over the course of several months.
    Emilio Ferreira Ruiz is the proprietor of one of the best tequila store in the world – El Buho, in Tlaquepaque, Jalisco. El Buho isn’t a must-visit site for tequila aficionados solely for the vast selection. People from all over the world come to El Buho, again and again, because of Emilio. He is a chemist by training, with a deep understanding of production processes. He is honest, ethical and fair with his customers. But most of all, he loves tequila! His passion for tequila knowledge is equal to that of our most hardcore guests. We are honored to call Emilio a friend and teacher.

    “Experience Tequila has been one of the key factors in making Tequila known as an excellent beverage. Their tours to distilleries and other sites are very professional. Experience Tequila’s visits to El Buho have helped me expand my knowledge of tequila, as we have very interesting conversations with Clayton’s visitors – sharing our perspectives on quality, process, history, master distillers and other topics.

    For me it’s an honor to know Clayton. He’s an excellent person and so his project couldn’t be any less. Congratulations, Clayton, on the fifth anniversary of ET. I am sure there will be many more years and successes in any project you develop. Cheers!”

    -Emilio Ferreira Ruiz, Tequilas El Buho

    El Buho

     

     

     

    This testimonial is part of a series marking Experience Tequila’s fifth anniversary. If you would like to submit your own, we would love to hear from you! Simply email us

    Emilio Ferreira (Tequilas El Buho) on 5th Anniversary of ET